Hello

There is a very large class of people that own 65/66 Mustangs that, as far as I can tell, anyway, have been, for the most part, ignored entirely. They don't really want that 100 pt. show car that is so nice and was soooo expensive that they're afraid to drive it, they also don't want to make their car capable of achieving warp factor three. They just want this car that they dearly love to be able to cruise around smoothly and reliably, without having it dump them out on the side of the road or have it start making weird noises or belching out big clouds of funky-smelling smoke. And I think, truth be told, that this is by far the largest class of Mustang owners. They take their car to some technician when what they actually need is a mechanic, and this, frequently, does not work out very well at all for the owner. They don't want to re-engineer the entire car, they just want someone to fix what broke. These are the people that I am trying help out with this blog. Some problems require a little bit of back and forth, as in, "Try this." "I tried that and it didn't change anything."
" Oh. well, you probably need to try that." " I tried that and it helped, but it still isn't quite right." "Now you need to try this...." If you go to http://www.allfordmustangs.com/ and then go to the classics forums, you will be able to do that with a pretty hefty gathering of some very knowledgeable people that also happen to be very friendly. None of that ridiculous one-upmanship, no flaming or abuse, none of that stuff. Just good, solid advice from people that know what they are talking about.

Monday, August 31, 2015

1965 1966 Mustang gauge Replacement

The gauges that Ford used in these cars were so incredibly durable, it is very unlikely that you would ever have to replace one, but, occasionally, you could buy a 65/66 Mustang and then discover that one of the gauges has been damaged somehow and needs to be replaced. Fortunately, this is an extremely easy task to perform successfully. First, you remove the instrument cluster. I did a post on how to do this (also very easy) in a post back in April of '08. Once the instrument cluster is out, put it face down on a soft surface, so that you don't scratch up the instrument bezel, and remove the eight phillips head screws holding the bezel onto the cluster. Then you lift the cluster off of the bezel and put the lens back in the bezel if it falls out. Then lift that black metal thing off of the cluster. You then take a 3/8 wrench and remove the two nuts holding the gauge in place, and save that paper-looking thing that the nuts are holding onto the back of the cluster. Those are extremely important because those are what prevents the gauge from just shorting out on the cluster. The old gauge will now fall out all by itself. You just place the new gauge in the cluster, put the insulator back on, put the nuts back on, making sure you don't crank down on them so hard the nuts cut through the insulator, and reassemble the cluster, black metal thing, bezel and lens. There are a couple of cardboard tubes in there that are also important. Those are what keeps the whole side of the cluster from lighting up and flashing every time you hit the turn signals. There are three little prongs that hold each of those tubes in place while you reassemble everything. It really is just that simple.






3 comments:

Ken Smlth said...

Is there anything I should be aware of while replacing the speedo head on 1966 mustang, I have one on order including the cable and new bulbs, looks pretty straightforward just wanted to know of any pitfall I may experience?

Thanks
Ken

Ken Smlth said...

Is there anything I should be aware of while replacing the speedo head on 1966 mustang, I have one on order including the cable and new bulbs, looks pretty straightforward just wanted to know of any pitfall I may experience?

Thanks
Ken

Veronica said...

Hi, Ken.
No, what you see is all that there is. It actually is as simple as it appears to be.